City of Richmond, Richmond Olympic Oval
City of Richmond, Richmond Olympic Oval
City of Richmond, Richmond Olympic Oval
City of Richmond, Richmond Olympic Oval
City of Richmond, Richmond Olympic Oval
City of Richmond, Richmond Olympic Oval
City of Richmond, Richmond Olympic Oval
City of Richmond, Richmond Olympic Oval
City of Richmond, Richmond Olympic Oval
City of Richmond, Richmond Olympic Oval
City of Richmond, Richmond Olympic Oval
City of Richmond, Richmond Olympic Oval
City of Richmond, Richmond Olympic Oval
City of Richmond, Richmond Olympic Oval

Visionary Legacy Olympic Venue Catalyzes Urban Redevelopment

City of Richmond, Richmond Olympic Oval, Richmond, BC, Canada

The signature venue of the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Winter Games, the Richmond Olympic Oval is the first Olympic speed-skating facility ever designed for long-term use. The building spurred the creation of a new urban waterfront neighborhood in Richmond, BC and continues to nourish and support it.

 
Historically, indoor long-track facilities that have been built solely to host Olympic speed-skating events have faced significant revenue and operations challenges post-Games because of their size. The Oval is different in that it continues to enrich its community as an international center for sports and wellness and venue for community events.

The Oval’s level of program convertibility and multi-sport use is unprecedented in high-performance sport buildings. The main activity space allows ice sports to co-exist with other sports or community uses simultaneously and the facility can revert to a speed skating oval. The building is also a model for sustainable design, earning LEED Silver and generating operational cost savings across its lifespan.


Richmond Olympic OvalRichmond Olympic Oval

I don’t think this is anything close to an (overstatement)- this building has no equal anywhere in the world. No building in Olympic history looks anything like this and will do anything like this.

– John Furlong, CEO – VANOC


100′ x 200′ – The Oval’s ceiling is made of salvaged pine-beetle-kill wood and is believed to be the largest surface ever covered in this once-discarded wood. Showcasing the use of the wood encourages its application elsewhere and mitigates the economic hardship the pine beetle epidemic has brought upon northern British Columbia communities.

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