Rudy Santacroce to Speak at Healthcare Systems Process Improvement Conference

  • Presenter(s): Rudy Santacroce, PE, CLSSBB, PMP, DSHS

Ben Juckes: Pushing Boundaries Through Computational Design

  • January 21, 2019
  • Author: CannonDesign

Surfing comes naturally to Ben Juckes, despite the fact that he did not take up the sport in his native Australia, one of the world’s premier surfing destinations.

It wasn’t until he moved to Los Angeles and began working at Yazdani Studio of CannonDesign, the in-house laboratory led by Mehrdad Yazdani with a staff of approximately 20 architects, designers, 3D artists, technical specialist and other creative thinkers.

For Ben, the sports’ appeal was always more about the surfboard, the idea of manipulating its form to maximize its performance – the architecture of it all. He plunged into the study of computational design (CD) in Perth, where he pursued a Bachelor of Environmental Science in Architecture at the University of Western Australia (UWA). There weren’t any courses in CD there, however, a one-year student exchange program at the University of Arizona introduced him to visual programming languages like Grasshopper.

“I was blown away by all the tools and technologies that people were using there,” Ben recalls. “The idea that you had the ability to harness complicated geometries through simple procedures really fit with my style of designing, and I decided that this is the way I wanted to practice architecture.”

Ben returned to UWA and earned his M.Arch, continuing to develop his skills in CD. He, along with fellow students and professors who were early adopters, established the “Hub,” a regular event for students to collaborate and share knowledge. He was also part of the team behind Augmented Australia, an exhibition at the Venice Biennale 2014, curated by the creative team known as felix._Giles_Anderson+Goad. It included apps that allowed users to visualize unbuilt modern and historic structures across the country.

After graduating, Ben transitioned from teaching evening classes on parametric modeling to taking on sessional staff positions at his alma mater. Though he enjoyed being in academia and plans to return to it someday, he felt driven to gain practical experience.

“I realized I needed to immerse myself in the industry before I (could) actually teach people!” says Ben.

Drawn back to the States, he settled in Los Angeles, which offered a similar laid-back vibe and warm climate to Perth. A friend introduced him to Yazdani Studio. Though he had been focused on computer modeling, seeing the many physical models displayed around the studio was one of the reasons he knew it was the right fit for him.

“You walk in and see it’s a playground of models,” says Ben. “That says something about the way the studio operates and that it’s a really cool, collaborative environment.”

Four years later, he is now an associate, having established himself as an expert in CD. One of his greatest strengths is creating DIY tools and custom workflows that challenge conventional practice.

The studio doesn’t have a dedicated CD team; rather, each staff member is encouraged to explore their own ideas in organic ways.“We have shaped our tools, but the tools are now starting to shape us,” Ben observes. “The term ‘computational design’ covers an extremely broad variety of roles and relationships. As it becomes more widely used across the industry, we will start to see bigger distinctions between these roles and the creation of more specialized divisions.”

“With a more diverse range of roles, coupled with advancements in technologies and applications, I think architects will retreat from outsourcing and create a new paradigm of insourcing,” Ben adds.

The first project Ben worked on with Yazdani was Lassonde Studios at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, a typology definer that hybridizes maker space and dormitory pods. The team utilized visual programming languages, like the Kangaroo plugin for Grasshopper, Dynamo for Revit, and other tools, to map relationships between programmatic elements. They also created a virtual reality game to help the university promote the project.

More recently, Ben has been focusing on Address Harbor Point, a set of slender, tapered residential towers on the waterfront in Dubai. By creating multiple iterations of physical models via 3D printers and utilizing Galapagos, another plugin for Grasshopper, Ben and his team have explored subtle rotations of the towers’ forms to investigate sight lines and maximize views from each unit.

These diverse experiences at Yazdani Studios have given Ben the space to dive even deeper into what excites him.

“A great thing about the style and culture Merhdad has created is that we all touch the projects in different facets, but we are encouraged to pursue and explore our own interests.” Those interests include making furniture, and, of course, surfing. He’s finally learned to surf along the coast of Los Angeles.

“I keep it practical outside of work,” says Ben. “It’s important to mix analog with digital. You have to get your hands dirty sometimes.”

World Architecture 100: CannonDesign Holds Strong as Global Design Leader

  • December 19, 2018
  • Publication: Building Design

Understanding the World of Telehealth Reimbursement

  • December 3, 2018
  • Author: Ian Kobernick

Telehealth not only has the ability to increase convenience and improve care for remote patients, it also improves emergency department throughput, and ultimately can reduce potentially avoidable admissions.

While telemedicine capabilities are some of the most exciting existing in healthcare today, inconsistent reimbursement standards continue to hinder successful program adoption. Challenges continue in navigating the state-level variability in regulations and capturing procedures to receive the appropriate compensation and reimbursement. Because of its potential, it is crucial for organizations implementing telehealth to work closely with legislators and insurance companies to ensure reimbursement occurs in a timely and effective manner. Fortunately, the growing interest in implementing telehealth solutions has prioritized reimbursement evolution.

The purpose of this paper is to review the current landscape of telehealth reimbursement and provide insight into strategies for dealing with the complex regulatory environment. For example, when we asked a renown Academic Medical Center in Dallas about its telemedicine capabilities, they give a semi-standard response: “We would like to offer more, but billing is a significant challenge.” We’ll also take a deeper dive and show how one particular organization’s telehealth services are functioning like a well-oiled machine.

Download our Tactical Report on Telehealth Reimbursement >

ASID Publishes Impact of Design on Nemours Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children

  • November 26, 2018

Decoding the Recipe for Success for Your Ambulatory Strategy

  • November 9, 2018
  • Author: Michael Pukszta

minnesotaWhile the major shift from inpatient to ambulatory care is allowing healthcare systems to remain at the forefront of medicine, it also creates significant challenges with respect to reimbursement, revenue, and patient volume. Exacerbating those challenges, there isn’t a “one size fits all” ambulatory strategy. Just as there is no single type of consumer, there is no single right or highest use of an ambulatory facility. Every patient is unique in how they want to interact with a health institution. And technology, digital solutions, experience, and patient expectations all play a role in their interactions.

In order to build a successful ambulatory strategy, health systems need to approach ambulatory care similar to how a chef approaches a recipe. While you may start with the same ingredients, the different amounts and ways in which they are mixed together will create very different results. It is essential for health systems to identify those ingredients, and then combine them strategically to create the successful recipe that matches their patients’ expectations.

Our ambulatory care team understands the many questions this “recipe” may pose for an organization, which is why our approach recognizes the uniqueness of each health system – targeting our efforts to identify ambulatory marketing opportunities and tailor solutions that correlate with each client’s definition of value.

We recently created a report that outlines the four major categories of ambulatory influencers and defines the building blocks for an ambulatory care site, to guide healthcare systems in tailoring an ambulatory strategy to their own unique brand of healthcare delivery.

READ OUR REPORT – PERSPECTIVES AND FUTURES IN AMBULATORY CARE >

CannonDesign Earns #4 Position in 2018 Architect 50 Rankings

  • November 8, 2018

How Architecture Can Help Address America’s Mental Healthcare Crisis

  • November 6, 2018
  • Publication: Metropolis Magazine

Houston Business Journal Touts Success of FKP / CannonDesign

  • October 26, 2018

Diane Osan to Speak at Equity by Design Symposium

  • 11/02/2018 - 11/03/2018
  • Presenter(s): Diane Osan