Jeff Murray
Jeff Murray
Sal Bonetto
Sal Bonetto
January 11, 2021

What You Should Know about Smart Research Environments

Jeff Murray
Jeff Murray
Sal Bonetto
Sal Bonetto

The topic of smart buildings and cities is perhaps as old as science fiction. Buckminster Fuller discussed these ideas in the 1930s. Nicholas Negroponte and his cohorts explored architecture machines in the ’60s and ’70s when they founded what is today the MIT Media Lab. There were promises of smart buildings in the ’80s and ’90s with the introduction of computer-driven building automation systems, but in all cases, the reality fell far short of the vision.

Today, however, there are communication, computing, and automation technologies that are cost-effectively turning these promises into realities. The future of smart research labs is closer than we think, even though skepticism is still high—particularly among those who fund and operate research facilities. That skepticism stems from concerns about whether so-called smart buildings are easier to operate or more difficult; whether they improve occupant experience or diminish it; and whether they are more sustainable and resilient, or more wasteful and fragile? There is no doubt that they are more expensive than their “non-smart” counterparts, so where is the ROI?

This paper explores that question and concludes that if designed right, these smart research environments can be easier and more cost effective to operate, more resource sustainable and more resilient. Learn more below.

Download our paper.